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Jan 9, 2018

EBOOK - Fundamentals of HEAT and MASS Transfer (Frank P. Incropera & David P. Dewitt)


EBOOK - Các nguyên lý cơ bản của truyền nhiệt (Frank P. Incropera & David P. Dewitt) - 1076 Trang.

In the Preface to the previous edition, we posed questions regarding trends in engineering education and practice, and whether the discipline of heat transfer would remain relevant.
After weighing various arguments, we concluded that the future of engineering was bright and that heat transfer would remain a vital and enabling discipline across a range of emerging technologies including but not limited to information technology, biotechnology, pharmacology, and alternative energy generation.

Since we drew these conclusions, many changes have occurred in both engineering education and engineering practice. Driving factors have been a contracting global economy, coupled with technological and environmental challenges associated with energy production and energy conversion.
The impact of a weak global economy on higher educationhas been sobering. Colleges and universities around the world are being forced to set priorities and answer tough questions as to which educational programs are crucial, and which are not. Was our previous assessment of the future of engineering, including the relevance of heat transfer, too optimistic?

CHAPTER 1 Introduction 1
1.1 What and How? 2
1.2 Physical Origins and Rate Equations 3
1.2.1 Conduction 3
1.2.2 Convection 6
1.2.3 Radiation 8
1.2.4 The Thermal Resistance Concept 12
1.3 Relationship to Thermodynamics 12
1.3.1 Relationship to the First Law of Thermodynamics
(Conservation of Energy) 13
1.3.2 Relationship to the Second Law of Thermodynamics and the
Efficiency of Heat Engines 31
1.4 Units and Dimensions 36
1.5 Analysis of Heat Transfer Problems: Methodology 38
1.6 Relevance of Heat Transfer 41
1.7 Summary 45
References 48
Problems 49
CHAPTER 2 Introduction to Conduction 67
2.1 The Conduction Rate Equation 68
2.2 The Thermal Properties of Matter 70
2.2.1 Thermal Conductivity 70
2.2.2 Other Relevant Properties 78
2.3 The Heat Diffusion Equation 82
2.4 Boundary and Initial Conditions 90
2.5 Summary 94
References 95
Problems 95
CHAPTER 3 One-Dimensional, Steady-State Conduction 111
3.1 The Plane Wall 112
3.1.1 Temperature Distribution 112
3.1.2 Thermal Resistance 114
3.1.3 The Composite Wall 115
3.1.4 Contact Resistance 117
3.1.5 Porous Media 119
3.2 An Alternative Conduction Analysis 132
3.3 Radial Systems 136
3.3.1 The Cylinder 136
3.3.2 The Sphere 141
3.4 Summary of One-Dimensional Conduction Results 142
3.5 Conduction with Thermal Energy Generation 142
3.5.1 The Plane Wall 143
3.5.2 Radial Systems 149
3.5.3 Tabulated Solutions 150
3.5.4 Application of Resistance Concepts 150
3.6 Heat Transfer from Extended Surfaces 154
3.6.1 A General Conduction Analysis 156
3.6.2 Fins of Uniform Cross-Sectional Area 158
3.6.3 Fin Performance 164
3.6.4 Fins of Nonuniform Cross-Sectional Area 167
3.6.5 Overall Surface Efficiency 170
3.7 The Bioheat Equation 178
3.8 Thermoelectric Power Generation 182
3.9 Micro- and Nanoscale Conduction 189
3.9.1 Conduction Through Thin Gas Layers 189
3.9.2 Conduction Through Thin Solid Films 190
3.10 Summary 190
References 193
Problems 193
CHAPTER 4 Two-Dimensional, Steady-State Conduction 229
4.1 Alternative Approaches 230
4.2 The Method of Separation of Variables 231
4.3 The Conduction Shape Factor and the Dimensionless Conduction Heat Rate 235
4.4 Finite-Difference Equations 241
4.4.1 The Nodal Network 241
4.4.2 Finite-Difference Form of the Heat Equation 242
4.4.3 The Energy Balance Method 243
4.5 Solving the Finite-Difference Equations 250
4.5.1 Formulation as a Matrix Equation 250
4.5.2 Verifying the Accuracy of the Solution 251
4.6 Summary 256
References 257
Problems 257
4S.1The Graphical Method W-1
4S.1.1 Methodology of Constructing a Flux Plot W-1
4S.1.2 Determination of the Heat Transfer Rate W-2
4S.1.3 The Conduction Shape Factor W-3
4S.2The Gauss–Seidel Method: Example of Usage W-5
References W-9
Problems W-10
CHAPTER 5 Transient Conduction 279
5.1 The Lumped Capacitance Method 280
5.2 Validity of the Lumped Capacitance Method 283
5.3 General Lumped Capacitance Analysis 287
5.3.1 Radiation Only 288
5.3.2 Negligible Radiation 288
5.3.3 Convection Only with Variable Convection Coefficient 289
5.3.4 Additional Considerations 289
5.4 Spatial Effects 298
5.5 The Plane Wall with Convection 299
5.5.1 Exact Solution 300
5.5.2 Approximate Solution 300
5.5.3 Total Energy Transfer 302
5.5.4 Additional Considerations 302
5.6 Radial Systems with Convection 303
5.6.1 Exact Solutions 303
5.6.2 Approximate Solutions 304
5.6.3 Total Energy Transfer 304
5.6.4 Additional Considerations 305
5.7 The Semi-Infinite Solid 310
5.8 Objects with Constant Surface Temperatures or Surface
Heat Fluxes 317
5.8.1 Constant Temperature Boundary Conditions 317
5.8.2 Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions 319
5.8.3 Approximate Solutions 320
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